FEATURED ARTICLES

Daily Sabah: A woman with a past
Taken from www.dailysabah.com/features/2014/07/12/a-woman-with-a-past: Fatima al-Fihri, a Muslim woman activist from the annals of history has been reintroduced to inspire future generations.
LEARN MORE
The role of Ibn Sina (Avicenna)’s Medical Poem in the transmission of medical knowledge to medieval Europe
Were you aware that in the Medieval Islamic world, celebrated scientists such as Ibn Sina used to relay their teachings through  poetry? Poems structure and rhythm  aided the process of...
LEARN MORE
Mosul the Pearl of Northern Iraq: Its History and Contribution to Classical Civilisation of Islam
Mosul, in Northern Iraq, is the country's second largest city and the north's major center for trade, industry and communications. Situated in the northwestern part of the country, on the west bank...
LEARN MORE
Four Medieval Hospitals in Syria
The creation of hospitals as institutions for the care of sick people was developed during the early Islamic era. Over time, hospitals were found in all Islamic towns. This article describes four of...
LEARN MORE
Rotterdam to host major 1001 Inventions Exhibition
Award-winning show about the scientific achievements of Muslim Civilisation
LEARN MORE
The European Muslim Heritage and its Role in the Development of Europe
In a keynote lecture pronounced by Professor Salim T S Al-Hassani in September 2003 at the European Parliament in Brussels, he used slides and 3-D animations to outline the impressive heritage which...
LEARN MORE
New Discoveries in the Islamic Complex of Mathematics, Architecture and Art
The complex of disciplines composed of mathematics, architecture and art in Islamic civilisation has been an important field of recent research. The scholars showed the interaction between...
LEARN MORE
The Sound Rules in Reading the Quran (Tajwid) in Qutb Al-Din al-Shirazi’s Music Notation
In the Islamic world, starting from Al-Kindī (d. 874), Al-Fārābī (d. 950), Ibn Sīnā (d. 1034), and Safī al-Dīn al-Urmawī (d. 1294) used the abjad notation to write music. Of these writers, the most...
LEARN MORE
Dialogue of Civilisations: From Ancient Maya to the Islamic world
As a means to explore ancient civilisations contributions to modern civilisation, the National Geographic Society, The Foundation for Science, Technology and Civilisation (FSTC) and supporting...
LEARN MORE
The Mechanical Water Clock Of Ibn Al-Haytham
The Foundation for Science, Technology and Civilisation (FSTC) announces their new achievement in the history of Islamic clocks. For the first time, the work of Ibn al-Haytham on the water...
LEARN MORE
The European Jerusalem: Sarajevo, where Muslim heritage flourished in Central Europe
During Ottoman rule, Sarajevo was heralded as the “European Jerusalem”, as its invaluable contributions to civil engineering, industry, trade and architecture attracted people from various ethnic and...
LEARN MORE
President of FSTC with Dick and Dom in "Absolute Genius" CBBC Programme
Scholar, inventor, mechanical engineer, craftsman and artist Al-Jazari featured on Dick and Dom's "Absolute Genius", Wednesday 26th February at 5:30 pm, CBBC. In a bid to engage pre-school...
LEARN MORE

RECENT ARTICLES

The Mechanical Water Clock Of Ibn Al-Haytham
The Foundation for Science, Technology and Civilisation (FSTC) announces their new achievement in...
LEARN MORE

Pages

The role of Ibn Sina (Avicenna)’s Medical Poem in the transmission of medical knowledge to medieval Europe
Were you aware that in the Medieval Islamic world, celebrated scientists such as Ibn Sina used to relay their...
LEARN MORE

Pages

Daily Sabah: A woman with a past
Taken from www.dailysabah.com/features/2014/07/12/a-woman-with-a-past: Fatima al-Fihri, a Muslim woman...
LEARN MORE

Pages

The Millennium Anniversary Of Abu al-Qasim al-Zahrawi
In 2013, the world community of scholars celebrated a millennium after the death in 1013 of the renowned...
LEARN MORE

Pages

Book Release: Publication of the Complete Critical Edition of Al-Isfizārī’s Corpus of Mechanics
Last November 2013, the world has seen a new unique publication.  The Al-Furqan Islamic Heritage...
LEARN MORE

Pages

Figure 2: The Balkans region according to Piri Reis in 1513. (Source: www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2012/08/evliya-celebi-early-modern-travel-and.html)
Figure 3: Careva Džamija or "The Emperor's Mosque."
Figure 4: Gazi Husrev-Beg Mosque, School, Library complex.
Figure 5: Outer walls of the Bezistan (covered market places) which was destroyed in the siege of Sarajevo, but has since reopened and is once again a trade centre lined with tiny boutiques, cafes and souvenir shops. (Source: www.sarajevofunkytours.com).
Figure 6: The Bezistan is renowned for its haberdashery and craftsmanship. (Source: www.sarajevofunkytours.com).
Figure 7: Inside the contemporary Bezistan. (Source: www.sarajevofunkytours.com).
Figure 8: Domes of the Gazi Husrev-Beg Mosque.
Figure 9: Fountain at the Gazi Husrev-Beg Mosque.
Figure 10: Interior of the Gazi Husrev-Beg Mosque.
Figure 11: Front view, Sarajevo clock tower. (Source: sarajevo.travel/en/things-to-do/sarajevos-old-clock-tower/181).
Figure 12: Close up of the Ottoman clock dial which still displays Arabic numerals so as to guide people for their daily prayers. (Source: sarajevo.travel/en/things-to-do/sarajevos-old-clock-tower/181).
Figure 13: Kuršumlija Medresa, where books/manuscripts used to be held. (Source: www.ghb.ba/index.php/en/about-us/new-building).
Figure 14 & 15: The newly built Gazi Husrev-Begova Library located on Gazi Husrev-Begova street. (Source: www.ghb.ba/index.php/en/about-us/new-building).
Figure 16: The “Kozja ćuprija” (Goat’s Bridge), built in the 16th century in legacy of the grand vizier Mehmed Pasha Sokolović. This single-arch bridge is 42 m in length and is an example of exceptional aesthetics. It is defined by two large round side holes to facilitate the construction and to serve as decoration. (Source: islamicartsmagazine.com/magazine/view/the_ottoman_bridges_in_sarajevo/).
Figure 17: The “Šeher-Ćehaja” Bridge, most likely named after one of Sarajevo’s governors, Ćehaja. It is a standard bridge with multiple arches. Its beauty is reflected in the poles with distinguished pedestals. The buttresses and the accentuated sculptural serves as a protection from the floods. The bridge is 40 metres in length at present, though was originally longer. (Source: islamicartsmagazine.com/magazine/view/the_ottoman_bridges_in_sarajevo/).
Figure 18: Muqarnas from the Gazi Husrev-Beg Mosque, Sarajevo. (Source: islamicartsmagazine.com/magazine/view/the_ottoman_bridges_in_sarajevo/).
Figure 19: The 'Latinska ćuprija' or Latin bridge is said to have received its name after the 'Latin mahala' district where merchants from Dubrovnik and other parts of Europe resided. The original bridge was built in the 16th century, but was destroyed in the flood and fully reconstructed in 1798. Sarajevan merchant, Abdullah Briga, left a charity endowment in his will, granting enough means that were used to fund the reconstruction. It stands at 40 metres in length and the bridge only has four arches visible, from the original five. (Source: islamicartsmagazine.com/magazine/view/the_ottoman_bridges_in_sarajevo/).
Figure 20: The Roman Bridge is contested to be one of the most unique bridges from the existing four bridges. Although, the name can be misleading, as the bridge was built in the first half of the 16th century, it is still to be established who exactly built this bridge. Some claim the patron was Rustem Pasha, the Grand Vizier of the Ottoman Empire, whilst others argue that it could also have been Semiz Ali Pasha or Gazi Ali Pasha. However, the name is likely to have derived from the ancient Roman road, or what is more likely, by the remnants of stone collected from Roman ruins used in the construction of this bridge. The bridge is 52 metres in length and is an example of extraordinary synergy between architecture and natural environment. (Source: islamicartsmagazine.com/magazine/view/the_ottoman_bridges_in_sarajevo/).
Figure 21: A google doodle honouring Evliya Çelebi’s 400th Birth Anniversary. (Source: http://www.hurriyet.com.tr/teknoloji/17367802.asp).
Figure 22: With the rise of economic and social standards in the early 16th Century, different religious and ethnic communities such as the Orthodox Christian and Jewish communities migrated to Sarajevo en masse. (Source: www.sarajevofunkytours.com).
Figure 23: Sali Shahsivari presenting his lecture in the "1001 Inventions" conference. © FSTC 2010.
Figure 24: The Sebilj Fountain, Baščaršija, Old Town, Sarajevo.

Pages

VIDEO GALLERIES

Pages