FEATURED ARTICLES

FSTC Newsletter Issue 11: January 2015
Dear readers of our Newsletter, Another year has passed and a new one has commenced with more successes and challenges to our noble mission. Professor Gomati and I would like to take this...
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FSTC at Second International Conference in Sharjah
FSTC and CE4tF are very pleased to have participated in the Second International Conference on Arabs’ and Muslims’ History of Science and the eleventh Conference on the Space Sciences and...
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UNESCO Announces 1001 Inventions Partnership
1000 Years of Arabic Optics to be a focus of the United Nations proclaimed 'International Year of Light' in 2015.
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The Scientific Center of Kuwait to Host 1001 Inventions in 2015
The Scientific Center of Kuwait announces the February 2015 opening of the award-winning 1001 Inventions Exhibition
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BSA presents prestigious award to Dr Anne-Maria Brennan
The British Science Association (BSA) awarded Dr Anne-Maria Brennan with the Sir Walter Bodmer Award. Dr Anne-Maria Brennan is board member of FSTC and Chairperson of CE4tF.
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The Transfer of Science Between India, Europe and China via Muslim Heritage
[Proceedings of the conference 1001 Inventions: Muslim Heritage in Our World organised by FSTC, London, 25-26 May 2010]. The Islamic realms served as a crucible for scientific learning from the...
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Black History Month: African contributions to Muslim Civilisation
From the grand University of Sankore, Timbuktu to mathematics and architecture in North Africa, the African contribution within Muslim civilisation is invaluable. As October marks Black History Month...
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1001 Inventions' Science Show and Schools Programme launches in Sao Paulo, Brazil
Tuesday 23rd September 2014, Sao Paulo: A new theatrical science show and educational programme was launched today at the Institute of Butantan. The ‘1001 Inventions Brazil Schools...
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The Courtyard Houses of Syria
The courtyard house is one of the most enduring architectural forms, transcending regional, historical and cultural boundaries. Its balance of simple appropriate construction, environmental control...
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Aleppo Citadel: Glimpses of the Past
The Citadel of Aleppo is one of the oldest monuments in the world. It is the most famous historic architectural site in Syria and is built on top of a huge, partially artificial mound rising 50m...
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The Fate of Manuscripts in Iraq and Elsewhere
In this well informed article, Dr Geoffrey Roper, an expert in the field, outlines an impressive portrait of the dangers and threats encountered by the national heritage of Iraq due to the dramatic...
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1001 Inventions launches Rotterdam Exhibition
Award-winning show about the scientific achievements of Muslim Civilisation now launched
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Figure 2: The Balkans region according to Piri Reis in 1513. (Source: www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/2012/08/evliya-celebi-early-modern-travel-and.html)
Figure 3: Careva Džamija or "The Emperor's Mosque."
Figure 4: Gazi Husrev-Beg Mosque, School, Library complex.
Figure 5: Outer walls of the Bezistan (covered market places) which was destroyed in the siege of Sarajevo, but has since reopened and is once again a trade centre lined with tiny boutiques, cafes and souvenir shops. (Source: www.sarajevofunkytours.com).
Figure 6: The Bezistan is renowned for its haberdashery and craftsmanship. (Source: www.sarajevofunkytours.com).
Figure 7: Inside the contemporary Bezistan. (Source: www.sarajevofunkytours.com).
Figure 8: Domes of the Gazi Husrev-Beg Mosque.
Figure 9: Fountain at the Gazi Husrev-Beg Mosque.
Figure 10: Interior of the Gazi Husrev-Beg Mosque.
Figure 11: Front view, Sarajevo clock tower. (Source: sarajevo.travel/en/things-to-do/sarajevos-old-clock-tower/181).
Figure 12: Close up of the Ottoman clock dial which still displays Arabic numerals so as to guide people for their daily prayers. (Source: sarajevo.travel/en/things-to-do/sarajevos-old-clock-tower/181).
Figure 13: Kuršumlija Medresa, where books/manuscripts used to be held. (Source: www.ghb.ba/index.php/en/about-us/new-building).
Figure 14 & 15: The newly built Gazi Husrev-Begova Library located on Gazi Husrev-Begova street. (Source: www.ghb.ba/index.php/en/about-us/new-building).
Figure 16: The “Kozja ćuprija” (Goat’s Bridge), built in the 16th century in legacy of the grand vizier Mehmed Pasha Sokolović. This single-arch bridge is 42 m in length and is an example of exceptional aesthetics. It is defined by two large round side holes to facilitate the construction and to serve as decoration. (Source: islamicartsmagazine.com/magazine/view/the_ottoman_bridges_in_sarajevo/).
Figure 17: The “Šeher-Ćehaja” Bridge, most likely named after one of Sarajevo’s governors, Ćehaja. It is a standard bridge with multiple arches. Its beauty is reflected in the poles with distinguished pedestals. The buttresses and the accentuated sculptural serves as a protection from the floods. The bridge is 40 metres in length at present, though was originally longer. (Source: islamicartsmagazine.com/magazine/view/the_ottoman_bridges_in_sarajevo/).
Figure 18: Muqarnas from the Gazi Husrev-Beg Mosque, Sarajevo. (Source: islamicartsmagazine.com/magazine/view/the_ottoman_bridges_in_sarajevo/).
Figure 19: The 'Latinska ćuprija' or Latin bridge is said to have received its name after the 'Latin mahala' district where merchants from Dubrovnik and other parts of Europe resided. The original bridge was built in the 16th century, but was destroyed in the flood and fully reconstructed in 1798. Sarajevan merchant, Abdullah Briga, left a charity endowment in his will, granting enough means that were used to fund the reconstruction. It stands at 40 metres in length and the bridge only has four arches visible, from the original five. (Source: islamicartsmagazine.com/magazine/view/the_ottoman_bridges_in_sarajevo/).
Figure 20: The Roman Bridge is contested to be one of the most unique bridges from the existing four bridges. Although, the name can be misleading, as the bridge was built in the first half of the 16th century, it is still to be established who exactly built this bridge. Some claim the patron was Rustem Pasha, the Grand Vizier of the Ottoman Empire, whilst others argue that it could also have been Semiz Ali Pasha or Gazi Ali Pasha. However, the name is likely to have derived from the ancient Roman road, or what is more likely, by the remnants of stone collected from Roman ruins used in the construction of this bridge. The bridge is 52 metres in length and is an example of extraordinary synergy between architecture and natural environment. (Source: islamicartsmagazine.com/magazine/view/the_ottoman_bridges_in_sarajevo/).
Figure 21: A google doodle honouring Evliya Çelebi’s 400th Birth Anniversary. (Source: http://www.hurriyet.com.tr/teknoloji/17367802.asp).
Figure 22: With the rise of economic and social standards in the early 16th Century, different religious and ethnic communities such as the Orthodox Christian and Jewish communities migrated to Sarajevo en masse. (Source: www.sarajevofunkytours.com).
Figure 23: Sali Shahsivari presenting his lecture in the "1001 Inventions" conference. © FSTC 2010.
Figure 24: The Sebilj Fountain, Baščaršija, Old Town, Sarajevo.
Figure 2: Professor Jim Al-Khalili, British Theoretical Nuclear Physicist, Academic, Author and Broadcaster, browsing through the book “1001 Inventions: Muslim Heritage in Our World” Source: www.1001inventions.com/mt/archives/blog_26/ProfJimAl-KhaliliBook.jpg
Figure 3: Jim Al-Khalili together with Professor Salim Al-Hassani, President of FSTC, at BHA 2013 Hollyoake Lecture Source: www.muslimheritage.com/uploads/Jim_Al-Khalili_13_10_22_7752.jpg
Figure 4: Professor Jim Al-Khalili presenting his lecture in the "1001 Inventions" conference in the Science Museum in London, June 2010. Source: www.muslimheritage.com/article/statement-professor-jim-al-khalili-opening-session

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