FEATURED ARTICLES

Lund Astronomical Clock
The genesis of this article lies in a recent visit to the Romanesque cathedral of Lund. While in the cathedral, I walked over to the medieval astronomical clock to await the moving figures and music...
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Top Seven Ingenious Clocks from Muslim Civilisation that Defied the Middle Ages
TIME TELLING MACHINES: Revealing 7 marvellous mechanical and water-powered clocks from early Muslim Civilisation. These sophisticated devices that defied the Middle Ages.
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Sub-Saharan Centres of Learning
Though we may think of Timbuktu as the pre-eminent site of pre-colonial West African scholarship, we must remember that there were other places spanning across the Western and Central Sudan that were...
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Announcement: On New FSTC Historiography
1.     Introduction The 1001 Inventions exhibition and accompanying literature and film have met with success and have been very popular. The...
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Omar Sharif’s final film dedicated to his legacy
Actor Omar Sharif’s final film “1001 Inventions and the World of Ibn Al-Haytham” has been dedicated to his legacy. Legendary Oscar-nominated actor Omar Sharif, who died on Friday 10 July 2015 in a...
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The International Year of Light Sheds Light on the Dark Ages
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The Astronomical Clock of Taqi Al-Din: Virtual Reconstruction
In his book The Brightest Stars for the Construction of Mechanical Clocks (Al-Kawakib al-durriyya fi wadh' al-bankamat al-dawriyya), Taqi al-Din Ibn Ma'ruf analyses the four main types of time...
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Abu al-Wafa al-Buzjanî
Muḥammad Abūʾl-Wafāʾ al-Būzjānī (10 June 940–997 or 998) was a distinguished Muslim astronomer and mathematician, who made important contributions to the development of trigonometry. He worked in a...
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World Environment Day
 World Environment Day 5th June
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1001 Inventions To Partner With China’s Biggest Science Festival
China Science Festival to host “1001 Inventions and the World of Ibn Al-Haytham”
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Ode to Ahmad Baba Al-Massufi
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Cairo University Announces Partnership with 1001 Inventions
Cairo University joins 1001 Inventions partners in Egypt 
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PICTURE GALLERIES

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Figure 2: Page from the Latin translation of Isagoge Johannitii in Tegni Galeni, a medical book by Hunayn ibn Ishaq (ca. 809-873). (Source).
Figure 3: View of Kitab al-Malaki (Royal book) of Ali ibn al-‘Abbas al-Majusi (fl. 940-980), known as Haly Abbas, which exerted a strong influence on the Western universities. Dedicated to a Prince of Shiraz, this well-organized compendium of medical theory and practice purported to contain everything a physician needed to know for proceeding with treatment. (Source).
Figure 4: Detail from the Latin version of Haly Abbas's Liber Totius Medicine Necessaria (1523). (Source).
Figure 5a-b: Page of Yuhanna Ibn Masawayh's (d. 857-858) Liber de simplicibus (13th-14th centuries). Treasured in the Middle Ages as a sort of "physician's desk reference," this work on simples and their applications has a remarkable number of decorative initial letters. (Source).
Figure 6a-b: Two pages from volume 30 of the book of medicine and surgery Al-Tasrif by Abu-l-Qasim al-Zahrawi (Abulcasis), as preserved in a manuscript in The Institute of Manuscripts of Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences in Baku. (Source a) - (Source b).
Figure 7a-b: Two pages from the original manuscript of Al-Tasrif depicting surgical instruments. © Institute of Manuscripts of Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences in Baku (Source a) – (Source b).
Figure 8a-b: Front views of two Islamic hospitals: The bimaristan of Nur al-Din in Damascus, founded in 1154, and the Complex of Sultan al-Mansur Qalawun (Mausoleum, Madrasa and Hospital) in Cairo, founded in 1285 . (Source a) - (Source b).
Figure 9: Medical prescription issued by the director of the Bimaristan Qalawun dating from the 9th century H/15th century CE, Mamluk period. © Museum of Islamic Art in Cairo. (Source).
Figure 10: Pages 270-271 from an 18th century edition of Rhazes' treatise on smallpox and measles: Maqāla fī al-jadarī wa al-hasbah (De variolis et morbillis), in Arabic and with a Latin translation by Salomon Negri, a Melkite priest from Damascus. Glasgow University Library Special Collections Department, MS Hunter 133. (Source).
Figure 8: Front cover of Commanding Right and Forbidding Wrong in Islamic Thought by Michael Cook (Cambridge University Press , 2001, Hardcover, 720 pages ), a fundamental study on morals and ethics in the social history of Islam.
Figure 7: Painting atelier of the Ottoman Sultan dating from 1595-1603. The miniature shows the author, probably the court chronicler Talikizade, caligraphist and miniature painter, working on the Shahname for Mehmet III (ruled 1595-1603). Topkapi Saray Museum, Istanbul (Inv. 1609/74a) (Source).
Figure 6: Teacher and Students by Musa Roosta, from the School of Tabriz, 17th century (Source).
Figure 5: Laila and Majnun at school, a painting by Bihzad painted in 1494 in Heart, kept now in the British Museum in London. The painting illustrates a scene of a school with few boys and girls studying and learning from their teacher (Source).
Figure 4: A scene of teaching from a manuscript of the Rasa'il Ikhwan al-Safa dating from 1287 CE (Süleymaniye Library, Istanbul) (Source).
Figure 3: Front cover of The Refinement of Character, the English translation by Constantine Zurayk of Miskawayeh's Tahdhib al-akhlaq (The American University of Beirut, 1968).
Figure 2: Two recent editions of the Arabic text of Miskawayh's Tahdhib al-akhlaq: Dar al-kutub al-'ilmiya (Beirut, 1985) and Dar maktabat al-hayat (Beirut, 1989).
Figure 1: Scenes of teaching and learning in Islamic history (Source).
Figure 2: A shuttle aerial view of Palestine (Source).
Figure 3: Map showing Palestine's topography (Source).
Figure 4: View from Gaza City (Source).
Figure 5: Front cover of Life at the Crossroads: A History of Gaza by Gerald Butt (Rimal Publications, 1995).
Figure 6: The Great Mosque of Gaza, also known as the Great 'Umari Mosque (Al-Jami'a al-'Umari al-Kabir), is the largest and oldest mosque in the Gaza Strip (Source).
Figure 7: Coptic Church in Gaza City Suburbs (Source).
Figure 8: Views from Napoleon's Fort (Qasr El-Basha) located in downtown Gaza, an imposing stone building dating back to the Mamluk period. Napoleon is believed to have spent a few nights in it on his way through the town in 1799 (Source).
Figure 9: Four objects illustrating the ancient history of Gaza: a. dagger handle with incised geometric decorations, Early Bronze Age, 2700-2350 BCE (bone, length 19.5 cm); b. Egyptian scarab, Iron Age or Second Intermediate Period (enamelled steatite, length 1.4 cm, width 1 cm, thickness 0.6 cm); c. figurine: woman with drum, Iron Age, 8th-7th century BCE (ceramic, height 10 cm, width 5.2 cm, depth 5.2 cm); d. figurine: head with pointed hat (probably a horseman), Persian, 6th-5th century BCE (hand-modelled ceramic, height 3.2 cm, width 3 cm). © Antiquities Department of Gaza (Source).
Figure 10: Archaeological vestiges from Gaza ancient history: a. Aphrodite or Hecate with infant Pan, Hellenistic or Roman (marble, height 48 cm); b. bottle (alabaster), Low Period, 4th-3rd century BCE (calcite, height 14.5 cm); c. spherical phial, Roman, 1st century CE (glass, 6 x 4cm); d. Anthropomorphic jar, Roman, 1st-2nd century CE (glass, height 9cm, width 4.5 cm). © Jawdat Khoudary Collection, Gaza (Source).
Figure 11: Islamic objects from Gaza: a. Oil lamp decorated with arabesques, Umayyad, 7th-8th century (ceramic, 8.5 x 6.5 cm, height 4 cm); b. funerary stele with Arabic inscriptions, Ayyubid, 12th-13th century (white marble, height 39 cm, width 33 cm, thickness 5.5 cm); c. decorative plate with palm tree motif, Mameluk (limestone, height 33 cm, width 26 cm, thickness 10 cm); d. half dirham, Bahri Mameluks, Al-Mansour Nour al-Dîn 'Ali, Cairo, 1257-1259 (silver, 2.047 g). © Department of Antiquities, Gaza and Jawdat Khoudary Collection, Gaza (Source).
Figure 12: Front cover of the catalogue of the exhibition Gaza at the Crossroad of Civilizations: Gaza à la croisée des civilisations. 1. Contexte archéologique et historique, edited by M.-A. Haldimann et al. (Neuchâtel: Chaman Edition, 2007).

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