FEATURED ARTICLES

The Courtyard Houses of Syria
The courtyard house is one of the most enduring architectural forms, transcending regional, historical and cultural boundaries. Its balance of simple appropriate construction, environmental control...
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Aleppo Citadel: Glimpses of the Past
The Citadel of Aleppo is one of the oldest monuments in the world. It is the most famous historic architectural site in Syria and is built on top of a huge, partially artificial mound rising 50m...
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The Fate of Manuscripts in Iraq and Elsewhere
In this well informed article, Dr Geoffrey Roper, an expert in the field, outlines an impressive portrait of the dangers and threats encountered by the national heritage of Iraq due to the dramatic...
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1001 Inventions launches Rotterdam Exhibition
Award-winning show about the scientific achievements of Muslim Civilisation now launched
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Ibn Khaldun: Studies on His Contribution in Economy
In the following section, we focus on Ibn Khaldun's contribution to economic thought. We publish contributions by recognized scholars who endeavoured recently to give Ibn Khaldun long overdue credit...
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CE4tF at the British Science Festival 2015
CE4tF will be hosting an event at this year’s British Science Festival in Birmingham.
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Gaza at the Crossroad of Civilisations: Two Contemporary Views
Gaza, this tormented part of Palestine, land of suffering and resistance, is also a land of long history. This article presents two recent attempts to recover the ancient and medieval history of Gaza...
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Medicine and Health in Medieval Arabic Poetry: An Historical Review
This review of medieval Arabic medical poetry is based on our study of the two major classical biographical encyclopedias: “Uyoon Al Anbaa Fi Tabaqaat Al Atibbaa” ("Essential Information on the...
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Women Dealing with Health during the Ottoman Reign
In the history of Islamic civilization, many hospitals were founded by women, either as wives, daughters or mothers of sultans. All health personnel were male at these hospitals. In the Ottoman...
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Daily Sabah: A woman with a past
Taken from www.dailysabah.com/features/2014/07/12/a-woman-with-a-past: Fatima al-Fihri, a Muslim woman activist from the annals of history has been reintroduced to inspire future generations.
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The role of Ibn Sina (Avicenna)’s Medical Poem in the transmission of medical knowledge to medieval Europe
Were you aware that in the Medieval Islamic world, celebrated scientists such as Ibn Sina used to relay their teachings through  poetry? Poems structure and rhythm  aided the process of...
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Ottoman Music Therapy
Music has been used as a mean of therapy through the centuries to counter all kinds of disorders by various peoples. Physicians and musicians in the Ottoman civilization were aware of the music...
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RECENT ARTICLES

Architecture of Muslim Spain and North Africa
First in a series of articles on the Architecture of Muslim Spain and North Africa (756-1500AD). A brief...
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Figure 1: The Muslim Heritage Awareness Group (MHAG)
Proceedings of the Muslim Heritage Awareness Group Meeting
The Muslim Heritage Awareness Group (MHAG), a network of supporters and key associates of the Foundation for...
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Ibn Al-Haitham the Muslim Physicist
Snell is credited with the laws of reflection and refraction. However, Ibn Al-Haitham discovered the same...
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PICTURE GALLERIES

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Figure 2: Satellite global map of the Mediterranean. (Source).
Figure 3: Model of a "chebec", an Arab ship famous for its speed and maneuverability. The chebec proved so useful as a fast raider, despatch boat or even merchant ship that versions of it were adopted in other countries. (Source).
Figure 4: Front cover of European and Islamic Trade in the Early Ottoman State: The Merchants of Genoa and Turkey by Kate Fleet (Cambridge University Press, 1999).
Figure 5: View of Najjarin Funduq in Fez, Morocco. Like the Caravanserais, the Funduq is a North African term for a small, urban shop complex. A typical funduq is a square two-storey structure built around a central courtyard with shops on one floor and store rooms on the other. (Source).
Figure 6: Covered Bazaar in Istanbul. View from the Beyazit Gate, leading into the Kalpakçilar Street at its western end. Above the entrance is the royal monogram (tugra) of Abdülhamid II (1876-1909), marking the construction of the gate during the 1892-94 restoration. A short Arabic phrase included in the monogram medallion says: "God loves the one who does trade". (Source).
Figure 7: Front cover of Trade and Civilisation in the Indian Ocean: An Economic History from the Rise of Islam to 1750 by K. N. Chaudhuri (Cambridge University Press, 1985).
Figure 2: Vidinli Tawfiq Pasha's tomb stone (photo by Simo Pimtanen). Source: IMAGE The Bulletin of the International Linear Algebra Society, 19 (Summer/Fall 1997), p. 15.
Figure 3: Irish stamp on the Quaternions, issued by Ireland on May 4, 1983. (Source).
Figure 4: The original edition of Linear Algebra published in 1882.
Figure 5: Front cover of Linear Algebra published by the Istanbul Technical University in 1988.
Figure 1: Photograph of Nimrod's lens which was found in Nimrod's palace in the 19th century.
Figure 2: The oldest wall painting that shows a man wearing spectacles. Tomaso de Modena painted this painting in 1352 in the Italian city of Treviso.
Figure 3: A model of the first spectacles in the 14th century, this model is similar to what is sold by the antiques replica dealers.
Figure 5: Detail of a painting called "the Death of the Virgin" which was painted between 1400 and 1410.
Figure 6: The first printed drawing that shows medical spectacles. This was in a book called Liber Chronicarum by Schedel. This book was printed in Germany in 1493 and it is known that printing was invented in Germany forty years before the previous date.
Figure 7: Front cover of Diwan ibn Hamdis (Beirut, 1970).
Figure 8: A painting showing the Persian artist Ridhā al-'Abbasī in his old age. His student Mu'in al-Musawwer painted the paining in March 1635. The painting shows the artist wearing his spectacles and it is the oldest known painting in the Muslim world that shows spectacles. It is kept in Princeton University Library in New Jersey.
Figure 9: This painting is one of Ridhā al-'Abbasī's abum, it shows a man wearing spectacles and holding a book. This painting is dated to 1650 and it is now kept in Freer Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

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