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Newsletter 10: January Issue 2013
In the first days of the New Year, FSTC team is pleased to present to our wide community Issue 10 of this periodic publication. We list in this new release detailed coverage on FSTC recent activities...
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Figure 1: Professor Salim Al-Hassani, Chairman of FSTC and 1001 Inventions, welcomes the delegates in the opening session of the conference.
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Figure 2: View of the scholars and delegates attending the "1001 Inventions" International Conference at the Science Museum in London on Tuesday 25th May 2010.
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Figure 3: Mr Maurice Coles, CEO of CE4CE and the Global Curriculum Enrichment Initiative, gives his talk in the ‘Education Global' session of the conference."1001 Inventions".
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Figure 4: Ms. Bettany Hughes, Historian and TV Presenter, addressing to the delegates whom are attending the "1001 Inventions" International Conference at the Science Museum in London on Tuesday 25th May 2010.
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Figure 5: Left to right: Dr. Zohor Idrisi, FSTC Research Fellow, London, Prof. Jim Al-Khalili (Memeber of British Science Association and TV & Radio Presenter at BBC), Prof. Salim Al-Hassani (Chairman of FSTC and 1001 Inventions), Prof. George Saliba (Professor of Arabic and Islamic Science at Columbia University, New York), Dr. Rim Turkmani (Imperial College, London), Prof. Mohammed El-Gomati (York University, UK) and Dr. Charles Savage (Muslim Heritage Awareness Group, from Munich, Germany) at the opening session of the international conference.
Figure 1: Illuminated page from the Kitab Ihya' ‘Ulum al-Din (Revival of the Religious Sciences), Al-Ghazali's great masterpiece. Manuscript preserved in Tunisia's National Library, Tunis. (Source).
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Figure 2: Last page of Al-Ghazali's autobiography in MS Istanbul, Shehid Ali Pasha 1712, dated 509 H/1115-16 CE. (Source).
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Figure 3: Front cover of The Alchemy of Happiness, by Mohammed Al-Ghazzali, the Mohammedan Philosopher, translated Henry A. Homes (Albany, N.Y.: Munsell, 1873). Transactions of the Albany Institute, vol. VIII. Digital version. See another digital publication edition: The Alchemy of Happiness by Al-Ghazzali, translated by Claud Field, 1909.
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Figure 4: A leaf from Ihya' 'Ulum al-Din. Manuscript in naskh script from Eastern Anatolia or Iran, circa 14th century. Part of the celebrated treatise on the Muslim faith and Sufi life, Arabic manuscript on buff paper, 104 folios in naskh script, titles in large size, minor headings in red, very good condition. (Source).
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Figure 5: Page from the manuscript of the Ihya', vol. 3: Kitab al-Raja' wa-‘l-Khawf (The Book of Fear and Hope). MS in Arabic on vellum, Morocco, 1350, 17 folios in Maghribi script of Fasi style, with royal Marinid waqf inscription. (Source).
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Figure 6: Front cover of Al-Ghazali's book Letter to a Disciple, translated by Tobias Mayer. The Islamic Texts Society, 2005.
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Figure 7: Manuscript of The Alchemy of Happiness, Farsi copy held in the Bibliothèque Nationale de France in Paris. From Iran, 1308. (Source).
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Figure 8: Page from the Munqidh manuscript by Al-Ghazali (Suleymaniye Library: Sehid Ali Pasa No. 1712/2). (Source).
Figure 1: Location map showing Kerala in India.
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Figure 2: Statue of Aryabhata on the grounds of Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune, India. As there is no known information regarding his appearance, any image of Aryabhata originates from an artist's conception. (Source).
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Figure 3: View of Jantar Mantar Observatory in New Delhi, India, completed in 1734. (Source).
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Figure 4: 2 pages from Rigveda manuscript of mathematics in Sanskrit on paper, India, early 19th century, 4 vols., 795 folios. The manuscript is in Devanagari script with deletions in yellow, Vedic accents, corrections etc in red. (Source).
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Figure 5a-b: Palm leaf manuscript from Kerala. (Source).
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Figure 6: Old photo of the Madayi Mosque in the Malabar Coast, Kerala State, in the period 1919-1929. (Source).

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