On 23 April the World Celebrates the Book

World Book Day or World Book and Copyright Day is a yearly event on 23 April, organized by UNESCO to promote reading, publishing and copyright. On this occasion, we are pleased to invite visitors and readers of our website to celebrate reading and meditating on the various dimensions of the book in history and in our present culture.

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18 April, International Day for Monuments and Sites

Every year on 18 April, UNESCO celebrates the “International Day for Monuments and Sites”, whose establishment was approved by the 22nd UNESCO General Conference in 1983. 

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Medical Books on Healthy Living from Muslim Civilisation

If you think medical advice on healthy living - good nutrients, exercise and stress free existence is a modern medical practice, you might want to think again and join us to discover 5 medical books from 1,000 years ago that explored those exact topics.  

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Ophthalmologists of the Medieval Islamic World

The main purpose of this monograph is to review some of the contributions made by ophthalmologists from Muslim civilisation between the 9th century CE (early 3rd century AH) and the late 14th century CE (middle 7th century AH). The work is based upon my personal effort to collect microfilms and photocopies of Arabic manuscripts from public libraries in Syria, Egypt, Turkey, Tunisia, Saudi Arabia, Morocco, Rome, Paris, London, and El Escorial in Spain. The late Professor M. Rawwas Qal'aji and I had the opportunity to edit most of these manuscripts and publish them through different organisations.

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1st International Symposium Mediterranean Continuities: Material and spiritual paths

MOHA is organizing, an international symposium called: ‘Mediterranean Continuities: Material and spiritual paths’, which will take place on 15 – 16 April 2016 in Kavala, Northern Greece.

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World Water Day

Water is life... there are a few things that every human being agrees with. One of them is of course water being essential to our life. It is embedded not just biologically but in every part of our life both physically and spiritually. It is no surprise that most religions and cultures paid much attention to water. Islam, in particular, holds a very special place for water. This is manifested in its holy scripts and the vast works of scholars through Muslim civilization.

Today is a World Water Day, this day “is marked on 22 March every year. It’s a day to celebrate water. It’s a day to make a difference for the members of the global population who suffers from water related issues. It’s a day to prepare for how we manage water in the future. In 1993, the United Nations General Assembly designated 22 March as the first World Water Day. 23 years later, World Water Day is celebrated around the world every year, shining the spotlight on a different issue. Join the movement.” United Nations - www.un.org/en/events/waterday

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Intercultural Dialogue at the General Assembly of the United Nations

In 12-13 November 2008, the United Nations organised in New York a high-level meeting of the General Assembly to promote inter-faith dialogue. The meeting was marked by the active participation of the heads of state and senior officials of more than 75 Member States who came together to support mutual tolerance, respect and understanding. At the end of the high-level meeting, the General Assembly of the UN adopted a general declaration praising the values of tolerance and mutual respect between faiths and cultures. On the occasion of this high-level meeting in New York, The Foundation for Science, Technology and Civilisation organised at the UN in New York a display on "Multi-Faith Scientists in Islamic Civilisation" and a conference on the "Strategic importance of Muslim Heritage in our World and its impact on Diplomatic, Educational and Socio-economic Developments".

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Malika I: Khayzuran & Zubayda

From Indonesia to Pakistan, Kyrgyzstan to Nigeria, Senegal to Turkey, it is not particularly rare in our own times for women in Muslim-majority countries to be appointed and elected to high offices—including heads of state. Nor has it ever been.

Stretching back more than 14 centuries to the advent of Islam, women have held positions among many ruling elites, from malikas, or queens, to powerful advisors. Some ascended to rule in their own right; others rose as regents for incapacitated husbands or male successors yet too young for a throne. Some proved insightful administrators, courageous military commanders or both; others differed little from equally flawed male potentates who sowed the seeds of their own downfalls.

We begin in Baghdad.

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