When the World Spoke Arabic

At the height of the Golden Age of Muslim Civilisation, the Arabic language was the lingua franca that served as the language of science, poetry, literature, governance and art. A big movement of translation of Greek, Roman and other ancient books of science, philosophy and literature into Arabic gave a push for the continued success of Arabic taking centre stage of the old world. 

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Allah’s Automata – A Review of the Exhibition

Reflections on:
A New Exhibition on Artifacts of the Arab/Islamic Renaissance
ZKM, Karlsruhe, Germany: October 30, 2015 - February 28, 2016
http://zkm.de/en/event/2015/10/globale-allahs-automata
by Dr. Charles M. Savage
Knowledge Era Enterprises International
Munich, Germany
http://www.kee-inc.com

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Ode to Sheikh Abdul al-Amawi: The Old Man of Barawa

In this article, Natty Mark Samuels explores the life and contributions of 19th Century Abdul Aziz al-Amawi. Abd al Aziz al-Amawi originated from Barawa, Somalia and his subjects of expertise included theology, law, Sufism, grammar, rhetoric, and history. What is more, he composed an unfinished Swahili-Arabic dictionary.

Dedicated to Mohamed Kassim and Bradford G. Martin

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The Mechanical Corpus of Al-Isfizārī in the Sciences of Weights and Ingenious Devices: New Arabic Texts in Theoretical and Practical Mechanics

Editorial note: This article needs to be read in conjunction with the book release review of the Arabic edition, see: http://muslimheritage.com/node/2068

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Scholarly Traditions of the Schools in Baghdad: The Mustansiria as a Model

Baghdad schools are a challenging topic, involving several different facets of history. These include cartography to identify the location of each school, biographical studies to identify their teachers, preachers, jurists and administrators, along with their chronology. As such, schools were – and remain – inextricably linked to life’s numerous domains­.­Cultural continuity invites us to look further back into the scholarly traditions in the schools of Baghdad. Arabs and Muslims paid attention to knowledge from an early age, and during every stage of their lives. Knowledge, scholars and students were awarded unparalleled, unique status.2

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“Egyptology: The Missing Millennium” of Medieval Arabic Sources

In this paper, I would like to discuss the missing millennium of Medieval Arabic sources in the study of Egyptology. Much of the arguments that I present here are detailed in my book. These include: The demonstration that Medieval Arabs were interested in, had knowledge of and attempted to interpret the culture of Ancient Egypt: To show the relevance of these materials to the study of Ancient Egypt by bridging the gap between the works of the Classical writers and those of later Europeans: To encourage further study of the medieval Arabic material available, some of which could help archaeologists with descriptions and with the excavation and interpretation of sites, and perhaps even to reconstruct monuments which have long since disappeared. The word ‘Arabs’ has been employed here to indicate sources written in Arabic regardless of the ethnic or geographical origin.

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African contributions to Muslim Civilisation

Black History Month UK is an International annual month, celebrating, recognising and valuing the inspirational individuals and events from within the Black and Minority Ethnic communities. During Black History Month, we remember and celebrate the important people from the past and also who contribute to and help our society today[*]. This Black History Month, Muslim Heritage would like to draw your attention to some articles concerned with the African input in Muslim Civilisation in the fields of science, technology and civilisation. Some of these contributions include mathematics, philosophy, translation works, architecture, governance along with the founding and/or support given towards formidable centres of learning.

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Nearly 3 Centuries old light system illuminates a sacred grave on Sun's equinox

This year has been chosen as "International Year of Light (IYL2015)" by UNESCO, what a perfect time to remember these words: “If the first light of the new year doesn’t shine upon my mentor, then that light has no value for me” said the Turkish astronomer and Sufi philosopher, İbrahim Hakkı Erzurumi. He built a three-part mechanism that created an astronomical trick as a play of light. The "Light Refraction Mechanism" is a tribute to his teacher and mentor Ismail Fakirullah back in 18th Century. "On 23 September, on the equinox, the first beams of light captured from the sun rising behind the hill penetrate the window on the wall and reach the prism on the top of the tower as a block, which the prism then refracts and shines of the grave of Ibrahim Hakkı’s mentor. Hakkı’s light show of respect also repeats itself on the second equinox of the year, on 21 March, in Tillo (Aydınlar), a district of Siirt Province of Turkey."*

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President of FSTC at the Annual “Avicenna Studienwerk” Summer Academy, Osnabrück, Germany

On Monday 31st August, 2015, Professor Salim Al-Hassani, President of FSTC (Foundation for Science, Technology and Civilisation), was invited to participate in a day dedicated to learning about and discussing Muslim heritage in the sciences and how they may inspire contemporary and future students from Muslim backgrounds to become more involved with the sciences.

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